• Hjalmar
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    1 month ago

    They Nordic countries type of socialism may not be a replacement for capitalism (I live in Sweden so I’d know) but works alot more like the type of socialism that’s common in Europe.

    This terminology might not be on spot but I still think the Nordic countries are what most people would refere to as at least a little bit socialist. Maybe the proper term is social democratic?

    • macabrett[they/them]@lemmy.ml
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      1 month ago

      The proper term is social democratic. Socialism has a simple and specific definition. Those Nordic countries have changed nothing about who owns the means of production and therefore have no relation to socialism.

    • GarbageShoot [he/him]@hexbear.net
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      1 month ago

      but works alot more like the type of socialism that’s common in Europe.

      i.e. not the socialism of Marx

      but I still think the Nordic countries are what most people would refere to as at least a little bit socialist.

      If you ignore that country with 1.4 billion people and a few others, i.e. the majority of country calling their countries socialist.

      Maybe the proper term is social democratic?

      Yes, that is the proper term

    • davel [he/him]@lemmy.ml
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      1 month ago

      The Nordic countries are at best welfare capitalist states, and that welfare relies on the super-exploitation of the Global South. No Nordic country is even gesturing toward the abolition of private ownership of the means of production. In fact they’re moving in the opposite direction, toward the neoliberal privatization of more and more of the commons and the financialization of everything, which is burying the working class in debt. The Eurozone is just the cartel of the European private banks, and it was designed to enforce neoclassical economics and preclude Keynsian economics.